Las Vegas Shooting Shows How Vulnerable Concerts Are To Violence

 

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Photo Credit: Standard.co.uk

 

This morning, Americans woke up to news of what is called “The worst mass shooting in U.S. history.”

64-year-old Stephen Paddock shot into a crowd of twenty-thousand concert-goers with an assault rifle. He released multiple rounds from the 32nd-floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino as some witnesses said they’ve seen flashing from that window, others confused the shots for fireworks.

 

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Photo Credit: Today Show

 

The shooter didn’t have a criminal history and was living in a retirement facility in Vegas.

In the video released this morning, shots ranged out as attendees and performers dropped to the ground, some ran to safety as quickly as they could.

It’s a horrible situation as fifty people were killed and over four-hundred are injured. This is the second event this year where someone targeted a concert in a mass killing.

In May, Ariana Grande’s concert was subject to a suicide bomber in the Manchester Arena in England, killing 22 people, most were teens attending the concert.

These two situations prove that people with this type of anger and aggression to kill are looking towards big venues packed with people. Concerts draw in thousands of people, making it easier to kill, but harder to escape for concert-goers.

As more information about the story becomes available, we will bring you the latest updates regarding the shooting in Las Vegas.

UPDATE:  His girlfriend, Marilou Danley, was in the Philippines with her family during the shooting. Last reported, he wired $100,000 to the Philippines before the tragedy. The FBI is currently investigating when the money was transferred and who was the recipient.

The names of 59 people, including Paddock, were released earlier this week. 527 people were also injured in the mass shooting with but 317 people have been discharged from the hospital according to Las Vegas Metropolitan Police.

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